SHARE

KIRKLAND, Wash. — As Americans increase their life spans, many eyeing 100-plus, the odds of needing long term care increase. One solution is long term care insurance to pay the care bills. “A better solution,” says Cameron Truesdell, CEO of LTC Financial Partners (LTCFP), “is the insurance plus health habits to keep yourself on your feet as long as possible.”

To contribute to those good habits, LTCFP, the nation’s most experienced long term care insurance brokerage, is offering two free assists. One is a quarterly newsletter with prevention tips; the second is access to Living Longer, a new online group that will share videos and forum posts on healthy aging. The group is hosted by SuperLife World Service, a social network that promotes physical, mental, and environmental betterment.

Free access to Living Longer and a free subscription to the newsletter, called “Caring is Sharing,” may be requested from LTCFP at –
http://www.ltcfp.us/ltcfp/living-longer.html.

“Developing long-life health habits is like driving safely,” says Truesdell. “You definitely need auto insurance just in case. But you also want to avoid accidents.” The same logic applies to the risks of living longer, he asserts. “You need LTC insurance just in case. But you also want to do the things that keep you healthy, mentally fit, happy, and contributing for most of your days.”

According to the latest census estimates, there are now more than 60,000 U.S. centenarians, up 63 percent since 1990, with a projected 1,000,000 by 2030 and more than 4,000,000 by 2050. Morbidity, existing in a state of illness, looms with longer life spans. “But it doesn’t have to happen for excessive periods, not for everybody,” Truesdell says. “If we’re going to live longer, let’s live stronger.”

Valerie Gotten
Valerie G has been an editor with California Newswire for several years, is a gifted theremin player, can quote copious lines from 'Red Dwarf' and also knows where her towel is. Oddly, she does not drive, nor does she take the bus. She identifies as both human and democrat.