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Calif. Governor Brown Announces Appointments for Board of Parole Hearings

SACRAMENTO, Calif. /California Newswire/ — Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. on Wednesday announced the following appointments. First, Dan Figueroa, 60, of Blythe, has been appointed to the Board of Parole Hearings. Figueroa worked at Chuckawalla Valley State Prison as a correctional counselor from 1996 to 2010 and as a business services supervisor from 1992 to 1996. He served as a property controller with the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation from 1988 to 1992. Figueroa worked at the Board of Equalization from 1982 to 1988, serving as a statewide recruitment coordinator and a business tax representative. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $111,845. Figueroa is a Democrat.

Jack Garner, 67, of Gold River, has been appointed to the Board of Parole Hearings. Garner has served as a commissioner on the Board since 2005. He was a senior law enforcement consultant to the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training from 1990 to 2005. Garner served as the city manager of Martinez from 1985 to 1990. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $111,845. Garner is registered decline-to-state.

Howard Moseley, 44, of Sacramento, has been appointed to the Board of Parole Hearings. Moseley has served as an adjunct professor at the University of the Pacific, School of International Studies since 2005. He served in several postions at the Office of the Inspector General from 2004 to 2011, most recently as chief assistant inspector general of the Bureau of Independent Review. Moseley was a deputy attorney general in the Criminal Law Division of the California Department of Justice from 1996 to 2004. This position requires Senate confirmation and the annual compensation is $111,845. Moseley is a Democrat.

John Peck, 54, of Sutter Creek, has been appointed to the Board of Parole Hearings. Peck has served as a commissioner on the Board since 2009. He also served as a retired annuitant deputy commissioner with the Board from 2007 to 2009 and as a correctional officer in the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation from 1983 to 2007. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $111,845. Peck is a Democrat.

Michael Prizmich, 66, of Plymouth, has been appointed to the Board of Parole Hearings. Prizmich has served as a commissioner on the Board since 2007. He served Amador County in multiple positions from 1976 to 2006, including sheriff-coroner from 1995 to 2006. This position requires Senate confirmation and the annual compensation is $111,845. Prizmich is a Republican.

Terri Turner, 56, of West Sacramento, has been appointed to the Board of Parole Hearings. Turner has served as a retired annuitant deputy commissioner with the Board since 2008. She retired as a regional adult parole administrator in the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation in 2007 after serving there since 1980. This position requires Senate confirmation and the annual compensation is $111,845. Turner is a Democrat.

CA Government News, California Government, California NEWS INDEX, Newsdesk, Office of the Calif. Governor
 

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  • malibu1369

    Why in the name of all constitutional relevance would you name ex correctional officers and ex cops to the parole board. The parole board should be made up by people typical of a community where parolees would be located after their term of incarceration. This is one big reason for the very screwed up corrections system we have in California.

  • Carl ToersBijns

    Political appointments with persons that are former corrections employees could be tainting the board for parole hearings as they possess biases, stigmas, stereotyping attitudes that are counter productive if their thinking or behaviors are set in stone.. (hopefully not Gov Brown) So just in case, you must be very careful Governor as this is thin ice.. If you gotta look at corrections people for the board (not really a good practice) , you might be stacking the deck against your own ability to deal with releases, management of the prison populations and public perceptions of your ideology to improve prison conditions.. Good luck and if you need help, call me..